Best Kumquat Trees for Your Location

Kumquat Trees in ContainersSome kumquat trees are much better performers in gardens than others. Choosing the best kumquat tree to grow depends upon your usage, location, climate and growing conditions.

There are three varieties of kumquats (also known as ‘cumquats’), the Nagami and the Marumi (also known as the Calamondin) and Meiwa.

Nagami: the ‘Nagami’ kumquat is the best one for eating straight off the bush, as it is the sweetest. It is the most commonly grown kumquat and produces a high volume of small, bright orange oval fruit.  It makes an excellent container or pot plant. A kumquat tree planted in a container or pot will grow to a height of around four feet, but outdoor trees can grow to 13 feet or more.

Marumi (Calamondin): Marumi trees fruit several times a year, with the main crop in winter. The bushes are dense and they are the best looking of all citrus in containers. A beautiful variety with variegated leaves also is available.

Meiwa: Meiwa kumquat trees are more cold resistant than other varietals with larger, sweeter fruit—about the size of a small tomato. They are grown in China and Japan, but are rarely seen elsewhere.

For more information on these kumquat tree varieties refer to our Varieties of Kumquat Trees blog.

Location

Australia

Both the Nagami and Marumi kumquat trees are popular and grown widely in Australia.

United States

Florida

Both the Nagami and Marumi kumquat trees are cold-hardy and grown in Florida where they are harvested November to April.

Southern California

Both Meiwa and Nagami kumquats are cold-hardy. Tree foliage can withstand temperatures below 20º F

and therefore can be grown in areas that are too cold for most citrus. Fruit, however, are more cold sensitive.

Nagami is the most common variety found in grocery stores. Nordman Seedless Nagami, a new

release, has really nice fruit 1 to 1½ inches long without seeds, therefore, especially easy to eat or

preserve.

Texas

Both Nagami and Meiwa kumquats have very good cold hardiness and are suitable for growing in Texas.

You will find full details about kumquat trees and other citrus trees and great advice and photos on recognising and correcting nutrient deficiencies, pest and diseases and problems in Grow Citrus: The Insiders Secrets to Growing Great Citrus


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Best Lemon Trees for Your Location

'Eureka' Lemon Tree with Lemon Fruit

Some lemon trees are much better performers in gardens than others. Choosing the best lemon tree to grow depends upon your usage, location, climate and growing conditions.

Varieties of lemon trees include the ‘Eureka’, ‘Lisbon’ and ‘Improved Meyer’ lemons.  Lemon trees do not have a dormant phase in the winter and tend to produce flowers throughout the year so are vulnerable to cold weather. The ‘Improved Meyer’ is slightly hardier than true lemon and makes a better choice for home gardeners in a cold climate. For more information on varieties refer to Varieties of Lemon Trees Blog.

Varieties for Your Location

Australia
The ‘Eureka’ lemon tree is considered the best lemon tree for most areas of Australia. For cooler climate zones of Australia the ‘Improved Meyer lemon’ tree is also popular as it is the most cold-tolerant of all lemons.

United States
Florida

The ‘Improved Meyer’ lemon is the preferred variety for home gardens as the ‘Eureka’ and ‘Lisbon’ varieties are susceptible to citrus scab.

Southern California

The ‘Lisbon’, ‘Eureka’, Variegated pink ‘Eureka’ and the ‘Improved Meyer’ lemons are popular in Southern California. The Lisbon has cold resistance and is very heat tolerant. On the coast, trees can bear some fruit year round. ‘Eureka’ lemon trees bear fruit year round on the coast, fall and winter in the low desert valleys, and winter to spring production in the inland Riverside areas. Variegated Pink – a mutation of ‘Eureka’ that has variegated (green-and-white striped) leaves and immature fruit striped green and cream, mature flesh is light pink plus the tree itself is smaller making it very garden-friendly. ‘Improved Meyer’ lemon trees bear fruit year round.

Texas
Lemon trees growing outside the Lower Rio Grande Valley are at a distinct disadvantage with regard to climate, i.e., winter almost always will be accompanied by one or more freezes. Lemon trees are subtropical to tropical in nature; thus, they may suffer severe damage or even death because of freezing temperatures. However, there are some lemons that have sufficient cold-hardiness to sustain some freezing conditions.

If you live in coastal and southern Texas and are willing to put in the effort to provide cold protection for young trees, and sometimes even mature trees, you can successfully produce citrus fruits including lemons. The ‘Improved Meyer’ is popular in Texas due to it having fair cold-hardiness. The ‘Eureka’, ‘Lisbon’ and ‘Ponderosa’ lemon varieties are also grown but are less popular due to their poor cold hardiness.


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